Science is the poetry of Nature.







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Posts tagged "tech"

8bitfuture:

NASA preparing for comet encounter this weekend

Comet Siding Spring will be making its closest pass to Mars this Sunday, bringing with it a wealth of information about the formation of our solar system 4.6 billion years ago.

Siding Spring - named after the Australian observatory which first identified it - comes from the Oort Cloud, material left over from the formation of the solar system. It’s thought that the comet has come straight from the Oort cloud, making it the first time it has passed this close to the sun, giving scientists a unique opportunity to observe it and gather data as it passes only 87,000 miles (139,500km) from the surface of Mars. That’s less than half the distance between the Earth and the Moon, and close enough for NASA to decide to ‘hide’ satellites currently orbiting Mars to avoid the trail of debris. Their orbits have been altered just enough to ensure they will all be passing behind Mars at the time the worst of the comet dust is passing, while allowing them to still observe as much of the comet encounter as possible.

NASA has been hard at work repurposing a wide range of spacecraft for this comet encounter, with Mars satellites like the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) - which normally faces down towards Mars - being turned skywards to capture the event. Instruments on Martian soil are also being used to gather data, with cameras on the Opportunity and Curiosity rovers being adjusted to observe the comet.

Images of the comet will be posted in the days and weeks to come, at mars.nasa.gov/comets/sidingspring.

(via afro-dominicano)

theaatproject:

These Trippy Photos Show Art Colliding With Science

Today’s most innovative artists are taking not paint and chisel but science and technology as their media, to represent nature both seen and unseen. They are creating works radically different from any that have ever gone before and that may even change our perceptions of the world — truly the new avant-garde. I call this movement “artsci.”
As renowned video artist Peter Weibel says, “Today, art is an offspring of science and technology.” It’s an extraordinary thought. Today’s cutting-edge art doesn’t just use science and technology. It is actually driven by it.
afro-dominicano:

Remembering Stellafane


  "The image is assembled from several hundred 30-second exposures made while attempting to record Perseid meteors in August 2006. The unusual-looking building in the foreground is the famous Porter Turret telescope at Stellafane. Moonlight illuminated the foreground during the exposures" - Dennis di Cicco

afro-dominicano:

Remembering Stellafane

"The image is assembled from several hundred 30-second exposures made while attempting to record Perseid meteors in August 2006. The unusual-looking building in the foreground is the famous Porter Turret telescope at Stellafane. Moonlight illuminated the foreground during the exposures" - Dennis di Cicco

afro-dominicano:

Milky Way over Gemini Observatory by Joy Pollard

The Gemini Observatory consists of twin 8.1-meter diameter optical/infrared telescopes located on two of the best observing sites on the planet. From their locations on mountains in Hawai’i and Chile, Gemini Observatory’s telescopes can collectively access the entire sky.

Gemini is operated by a partnership of six countries including the United States, Canada, Chile, Australia, Brazil and Argentina. Any astronomer in these countries can apply for time on Gemini, which is allocated in proportion to each partner’s financial stake. [**]

New Galactic Supercluster Map Shows Milky Way’s ‘Heavenly’ Home

A new cosmic map is giving scientists an unprecedented look at the boundaries for the giant supercluster that is home to Earth’s own Milky Way galaxy and many others. Scientists even have a name for the colossal galactic group: Laniakea, Hawaiian for “immeasurable heaven.”

Image 1: Scientists have created the first map of a colossal supercluster of galaxies known as Laniakea, the home of Earth’s Milky Way galaxy and many other. This computer simulation, a still from a Nature journal video, depicts the giant supercluster, with the Milky Way’s location shown as a red dot. Credit: [Nature Video](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rENyyRwxpHo)

Image 2: This computer-generated depiction of the Laniakea Supercluster of galaxies, which includes the Milky Way galaxy containing Earth’s solar system, shows a view of the supercluster as seen from the supergalactic equatorial plane. Credit: SDvision interactive visualization software by DP at CEA/Saclay, France

The scientists responsible for the new 3D map suggest that the newfound Laniakea supercluster of galaxies may even be part of a still-larger structure they have not fully defined yet.

"We live in something called ‘the cosmic web,’ where galaxies are connected in tendrils separated by giant voids," said lead study author Brent Tully, an astronomer at the University of Hawaii at Honolulu.

Galactic structures in space

Galaxies are not spread randomly throughout the universe. Instead, they clump in groups, such as the one Earth is in, the Local Group, which contains dozens of galaxies. In turn, these groups are part of massive clusters made up of hundreds of galaxies, all interconnected in a web of filaments in which galaxies are strung like pearls. The colossal structures known as superclusters form at the intersections of filaments.

The giant structures making up the universe often have unclear boundaries. To better define these structures, astronomers examined Cosmicflows-2, the largest-ever catalog of the motions of galaxies, reasoning that each galaxy belongs to the structure whose gravity is making it flow toward.

"We have a new way of defining large-scale structures from the velocities of galaxies rather than just looking at their distribution in the sky," Tully said.

(via afro-dominicano)

txchnologist:

This Isn’t Your Grandparents’ Machine Lubricant

by Michael Keller

Gears, actuators and whirring machine parts are all around us. The modern automobile alone can have upwards of 50 electric motors—from electric windshield wipers to alternators—whose guts include pieces of metal rubbing against other parts.

The only thing that keeps these components from grinding away into powder is a liquid lubricant, a substance typically made of a petroleum-derived base oil mixed with additives that reduce friction between moving parts. 

Now researchers in Germany say they have made a breakthrough in developing the next generation of lubricants. Their new liquid formulation, they say, lets small gears run with virtually no friction. The source of this wear-reducing elixir? The liquid crystals inside your computer and TV screen.

Read More

teachnologies:

MIT’s New Robot Glove can Give You Extra Fingers
Have you ever wondered if five fingers is really enough? The folks at MIT have. Researchers in the institute’s department of mechanical engineering have created a robotic glove that adds two additional digits to the standard human claw, positioning two long fingers on either side of the hand. It’s ridiculously easy to use, too. “You do not need to command the robot, but simply move your fingers naturally.” Ford Professor of Engineering Harry Asada says. “Then the robotic fingers react and assist your fingers.” The glove’s movements are based on biomechanical synergy, the idea that each finger reacts to the movements of its peers - if you try to grasp a bottle, the glove’s extra fingers will try to help.

(via afro-dominicano)

txchnologist:

Olá Robocup 2014!

Now that the warm-up meatbag football matches have ended in Brazil, it’s time to move on to the main event: Robocup 2014. The international robotics competition runs on July 21-24 in João Pessoa and, though a winner will of course be crowned, the event’s long-term goal is “developing by 2050 a humanoid robot soccer team capable of winning against the human team champion of the FIFA World Cup.”

Go to Robocup 2014 to learn more about the matches that feature fully autonomous multi-robot teams battling it out on the field. See the video below.

Read More

(via afro-dominicano)

wildcat2030:

Scientists Create a New Type of Ultra-High-Res Flexible Display
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We are surrounded by imperfect screens. Our smartphones, laptops, televisions, watches, billboards, thermostats and even glasses all have screens with drawbacks: Some don’t work in sunlight, others mercilessly drain your battery; some can’t do rich color, and some can’t display a true black; most can’t be rolled up and tucked in your pocket. But something better may be on the way. In research published today in Nature, scientists describe what may be the first steps toward creating a new type of ultrathin, superfast, low-power, high-resolution, flexible color screen. If the inevitable engineering difficulties in bringing a product from the lab to the living room can be overcome, these displays could combine some of the best features of current display technologies. The new displays work with familiar materials, including the metal alloy already used to store data on some CDs and DVDs. The key property of these materials is that they can exist in two states. Zap them with heat, light, or electricity and they switch from one state to the other. Scientists call them phase-change materials (PCMs). “It is really fascinating that phase-change materials, now widely used in optical and nonvolatile electronic memory devices, found a potentially new application in display technology,” said Alex Kolobov, a researcher at Japan’s Nanoelectronics Research Institute who was not involved in the new work. (via Scientists Create a New Type of Ultra-High-Res Flexible Display | Gadget Lab | WIRED)

humanoidhistory:

The International Space Station cruises over the Pacific at 28,000kph. Sourced from a Vine sent by astronaut Reid Wiseman.

humanoidhistory:

The International Space Station cruises over the Pacific at 28,000kph. Sourced from a Vine sent by astronaut Reid Wiseman.

(via afro-dominicano)

afro-dominicano:

Mars One Wants to Send Your Experiments to the Red Planet

The nonprofit organization that has raised eyebrows with its plans to send people on a one-way mission to Mars is now accepting proposals for scientific payloads that could fly aboard an unmanned mission to the Red Planet in 2018.

Image: The non-profit Mars One organization wants to send a lander to the Red Planet in 2018. The lander will have seven different science payloads, and people everywhere can submit their ideas to the organization now. Credit: Bryan Versteeg/Mars One Foundation

The Netherlands-based Mars One foundation aims to send a total of seven payloads: four demonstration payloads, one payload selected in a worldwide university competition and two payloads for sale to the highest bidder.

The unmanned 2018 mission will serve as preparation for a planned human mission to Mars in 2024, Mars One organizers said. As of May, the nonprofit had whittled down its pool of potential astronauts to 705 candidates. Mars One aims to send four people on a one-way trip to the Red Planet every two years, starting in 2024.

Mars One is asking for input from the scientific community in order to source the best ideas from around the world, Arno Wielders, co-founder and chief technical officer of Mars One, said in a statement.

"The ideas that are adopted will not only be used on the lander in 2018, but will quite possibly provide the foundation for the first human colony on Mars," Wielders said.

Mars One is expected to send these payloads aboard the lander that is scheduled to launch in August 2018 and will be built on the same platform used for NASA’s 2007 Phoenix mission. Mars One and Lockheed Martin are partnering to develop a mission concept for the lander.

The four demonstration payloads will test technologies needed for the permanent human settlement of Mars. These will include an experiment to collect Martian soil for water production, an experiment to extract water from the soil, a thin-film solar panel for energy generation and a camera system that will interface with a Mars-synchronous communications satellite that will relay live video to Earth, according to Mars One.

afro-dominicano:

Private Team Prepares to Fire 36-Year-Old NASA Probe’s Engine


  A 36-year-old spacecraft controlled by a private team nearly performed an engine firing Wednesday (June 25) to increase its spin, but the maneuver was called off due to concerns that the probe did not receive all commands.
  
  NASA’s International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 probe, controlled by a group that calls itself the “ISEE-3 Reboot Project,” is expected to be redirected to a more advantageous orbit for Earth communications next week. But first, the team needs to increase the spacecraft’s roll very slightly.
  
  An earlier attempt to increase the roll rate was called off last Friday (June 20) after the team could not confirm the spacecraft received some test commands from Earth. This time around, the group inched closer to making the roll, but decided to stop when the very last command did not get confirmed.

afro-dominicano:

Private Team Prepares to Fire 36-Year-Old NASA Probe’s Engine

A 36-year-old spacecraft controlled by a private team nearly performed an engine firing Wednesday (June 25) to increase its spin, but the maneuver was called off due to concerns that the probe did not receive all commands.

NASA’s International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 probe, controlled by a group that calls itself the “ISEE-3 Reboot Project,” is expected to be redirected to a more advantageous orbit for Earth communications next week. But first, the team needs to increase the spacecraft’s roll very slightly.

An earlier attempt to increase the roll rate was called off last Friday (June 20) after the team could not confirm the spacecraft received some test commands from Earth. This time around, the group inched closer to making the roll, but decided to stop when the very last command did not get confirmed.

afro-dominicano:

Milky Way Meets Desert Sky by Babak Tafreshi

As seen on the National Geographic News our Milky Way galaxy gleams in all its splendor, as seen from La Silla observatory in the southern outskirts of the Atacama Desert, Chile.

The clear, high altitude dry desert air provides a perfect home for the La Silla, operated by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), where the 3.6-meter New Technology Telescope (NTT) makes its nightly rounds of the sky’s far reaches.

The telescope rests between the open doors in the photo. The Milky Way spans more than 100,000 light-years across, putting Earth in the cosmic suburbs, some 27,000 light-years away from the brightly glowing center of the galaxy, seen at the center of this image.

Visible to the left of the Milky Way is the bright orange star Antares at the heart of Scorpius (The Scorpion). Saturn can be seen as the brightest point to the upper left of Antares and Alpha and Beta Centauri glow in the upper right of the image. The Southern Cross (Crux) and the Coalsack dark nebula are also visible at the upper right corner.

afro-dominicano:

humanoidhistory:

Computer games, Los Angeles, California, November 11, 1984, photo by Anne Knudsen. Original caption: “Six-year-old Jennifer Chadorchi, a student at Hiteach computer school in Westwood, has developed a friendly attitude toward the computer.” (Los Angeles Public Library)

bbys in STEM :’)