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Posts tagged "skin"

biocanvas:

A growing fibrosarcoma tumor in mouse skin triggers neoangiogenesis, the generation of new blood vessels that supply the tumor with nourishment. Tumor cells are labeled yellow and red, blood vessels are in green, and collagen fibers are in blue.

Image by Stephanie Alexander and Peter Friedl, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center.

(via afro-dominicano)

biocanvas:

A growing fibrosarcoma tumor in mouse skin triggers neoangiogenesis, the generation of new blood vessels that supply the tumor with nourishment. Tumor cells are labeled yellow and red, blood vessels are in green, and collagen fibers are in blue.

Image by Stephanie Alexander and Peter Friedl, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center.

(via afro-dominicano)

jtotheizzoe:

Rosacea may be caused by mite feces in your pores

Know someone who suffers from rosacea? The “Curse of the Celts”? Between 5 and 20 percent of humans are affected with this inflammatory skin condition.

Are you eating? Hope not. Turns out it may be caused by an immune reaction to the feces of skin mites.

Microscopic Demodex mites live on our skin, deep in our pores, and are more numerous in those who suffer from rosacea. After mating, they die in your pores. Since they have no anus, their mite poo just sits there, full of a certain bacteria that is thought to trigger the immune reaction causing rosacea.

Read more about the research at New Scientist. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I need to go wash my face.

(image remixed from Wikipedia)

biocanvas:

Skin fibroblasts from the Indian muntjac, a deer found in Southern and Southeastern Asia.

Image by Jerrod Salisbury.

(via biocanvas)

Skin cells have been converted directly into cells which develop into the main components of the brain, by researchers studying mice in California.

The experiment, reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, skipped the middle “stem cell” stage in the process.

The researchers said they were “thrilled” at the potential medical uses.

Far more tests are needed before the technique could be used on human skin.

Stem cells, which can become any other specialist type of cell from brain to bone, are thought to have huge promise in a range of treatments. Many trials are taking place, such as in stroke patients or specific forms of blindness.

One of the big questions for the field is where to get the cells from. There are ethical concerns around embryonic stem cells and patients would need to take immunosuppressant drugs as any stem cell tissue would not match their own.

An alternative method has been to take skin cells and reprogram them into “induced” stem cells. These could be made from a patient’s own cells and then turned into the cell type required, however, the process results in cancer-causing genes being activated.

[Read More]

micro-scopic:

Skin, Thick, Human Epidermis (KE stain)

Skin ‘sees’ the light to protect against sunshine

Step into the sun and it’s not just your eyes that sense the light. Your skin contains photoreceptors like those in the retina, allowing it to mount an immediate defence against damaging ultraviolet radiation.

The skin tans by producing melanin, a pigment that protects DNA from dangerous UV rays. We already know that one component of the UV rays – called UVB – ramps up melanin production a few days after sun exposure in response to DNA damage in the skin. But another component of the radiation – UVA – encourages pigment production within minutes.

Read on..