Science is the poetry of Nature.







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Posts tagged "exercise"

ikenbot:

If you’re taking the brain exercises as seriously as I am, I suggest getting a small pad and writing ideas, bad habits, good habits (so you can identify your strengths and weaknesses), and whenever you acquire insights and new info that’s really important for you to know.. write it down, even if you feel like you wont forget it. Also, buy yourself a little sketchpad doesn’t matter the quality, and some pencils for you to doodle little images, concepts, visual ideas that come to your head, don’t tell yourself “I’m not an artist” because this isn’t about your “you/me” sense, this is about exposing the brain to new experiences and force its neural pathways to start working differently now that you’re.. switching things up. Always take the time out throughout the day to unplug from the screens and get other parts of your brain in motion. And don’t give up on your brain! It really does work. I’ll write up some things that have been helping me later tonight. You wanted to experiment with your senses? Well here’s a nice way to do that with your brain with no reliance on outside substances to help you change your perception of things.

expose-the-light:

A cool hand could help you lose weight

Sure, icing your wrists can help you cool down more easily — but could chilling your palms help you lose weight and stay in shape?

A small study being presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism 2012 Scientific Sessions used palm cooling to help obese women exercise, and noted that not only did they stay with the exercise longer, but saw better improvements.

Top image: Stabil on Flickr.

The researchers actually used an expensive piece of sports equipment for the study, but a chilled water bottle would serve much the same purpose. Half the group of obese women worked out holding a cylinder filled with water at 60.8°F, and half at 98.6°F. Put through a series of exercises designed to gradually work up to 80% maximum heart rate for 45 minutes, those with warm water dropped out of the process earlier. The women using the cool solution saw an average improvement of five minutes off the time to walk 1.5 miles, lost an average of three inches off their waists, and had lower resting blood pressure.

The study’s leader Dr. Stacy Sims suggested the reason for the difference was it might “help exercisers feel cooler, less sweaty and less fatigued — allowing them to work out longer and make them more likely to stick with their exercise regimen.”

My concern with this study is that the one group of women were holding a tube of body temperature water in their palms — essentially negating the inherent air cooling properties of one’s hands. During exercise, humans thermoregulate primarily through evaporation, and this effectively blocks off that method for part of the body, which might make the exercisers feel even worse about what they’re doing.

Still, it certainly wouldn’t hurt to run with a cold water bottle in hand while trying to get back in shape for summer.

womenaresociety:

A Scientific Look at the Dangers of High Heels
Does it fundamentally matter if a woman’s calf muscle fibers shorten and she neglects her tendons while walking, especially if she loves the looks of her Louboutins?
That question is difficult for a biomechanist to answer, Dr. Cronin admits. Aesthetics are outside the realm of his branch of science. But the risk of injury is not. “We think that the large muscle strains that occur when walking in heels may ultimately increase the likelihood of strain injuries,” he says. (This risk is separate from the chances that a woman, if unfamiliar with heels, may topple sideways and twist an ankle or bruise her self-image, which is an acute injury and happened to me only the one time.)
The risks extend to workouts, when heel wearers abruptly switch to sneakers or other flat shoes. “In a person who wears heels most of her working week,” Dr. Cronin says, the foot and leg positioning in heels “becomes the new default position for the joints and the structures within. Any change to this default setting,” he says, like pulling on Keds or Crocs, constitutes “a novel environment, which could increase injury risk.”
It should be noted, he adds, that in his study, the volunteers “were quite young, average age 25, suggesting that it is not necessary to wear heels for a long time, meaning decades, before adaptations start to occur.”
So, if you do wear heels and are at all concerned about muscle and joint strains, his advice is simple. Try, if possible, to ease back a bit on the towering footwear, he says. Wear high heels maybe “once or twice a week,” he says. And if that’s not practical or desirable, “try to remove the heels whenever possible, such as when you’re sitting at your desk.” The shoes can remain alluring, even nestled beside your feet.
*Click above to read the full article

womenaresociety:

A Scientific Look at the Dangers of High Heels

Does it fundamentally matter if a woman’s calf muscle fibers shorten and she neglects her tendons while walking, especially if she loves the looks of her Louboutins?

That question is difficult for a biomechanist to answer, Dr. Cronin admits. Aesthetics are outside the realm of his branch of science. But the risk of injury is not. “We think that the large muscle strains that occur when walking in heels may ultimately increase the likelihood of strain injuries,” he says. (This risk is separate from the chances that a woman, if unfamiliar with heels, may topple sideways and twist an ankle or bruise her self-image, which is an acute injury and happened to me only the one time.)

The risks extend to workouts, when heel wearers abruptly switch to sneakers or other flat shoes. “In a person who wears heels most of her working week,” Dr. Cronin says, the foot and leg positioning in heels “becomes the new default position for the joints and the structures within. Any change to this default setting,” he says, like pulling on Keds or Crocs, constitutes “a novel environment, which could increase injury risk.”

It should be noted, he adds, that in his study, the volunteers “were quite young, average age 25, suggesting that it is not necessary to wear heels for a long time, meaning decades, before adaptations start to occur.”

So, if you do wear heels and are at all concerned about muscle and joint strains, his advice is simple. Try, if possible, to ease back a bit on the towering footwear, he says. Wear high heels maybe “once or twice a week,” he says. And if that’s not practical or desirable, “try to remove the heels whenever possible, such as when you’re sitting at your desk.” The shoes can remain alluring, even nestled beside your feet.

*Click above to read the full article

(via afro-dominicano)

jtotheizzoe:

Work Hard, Play Hard, Live Long?

We know that exercise is good for you. Not only for your short-term health, but also to stave off disease and aging. We’ve covered before how exercise is the single best thing you can do when it comes to healthy living (but not the only thing, of course). What we don’t know is exactly how that happens.

Thanks to new research in active mice, we may be closer to understanding why.

It has to do with “autophagy”, a mechanism by which cells recycle worn out proteins and organelles. Perhaps by cleaning up the junk, they prevent toxic compounds and free radicals from building up? Cells that are exercised more are cells that recycle more. From The Economist:

Autophagy is an ancient mechanism, shared by all eukaryotic organisms (those which, unlike bacteria, keep their DNA in a membrane-bound nucleus within their cells). It probably arose as an adaptation to scarcity of nutrients. Critters that can recycle parts of themselves for fuel are better able to cope with lean times than those that cannot. But over the past couple of decades, autophagy has also been shown to be involved in things as diverse as fighting bacterial infections and slowing the onset of neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases.

(via The Economist)

PS - I know that’s a guinea pig, not a mouse. Sue me. Dude’s a boss on the weights.