Science is the poetry of Nature.







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Posts tagged "everything"

abluegirl:

A selection of images of Earth from space, taken by Landsat 5, which is set to be retired after 29 years.

Originally set to orbit Earth for three years, the satellite lived well beyond its intended means. But, a recently broken gyroscope has declared the end of the machine’s time in space.

It orbited Earth more than 150,000 times, capturing more than 2.5 million images of our world’s terrain. In honor of the mission’s end, here are a collection of Landsat 5’s best images of our planet. Landsat 7, which has been orbiting Earth since 1999, will remain overhead and Landsat 8 will be launched into space in February 2013. (x)

quantumaniac:

Potential New Clock Measures Time Based on Mass

It’s part clock, part scale: A newly developed atomic clock measures time based on the mass of a single atom. The research, published online January 10 inScience, is controversial but could provide scientists with more precise methods of measuring both time and mass.

“This is the first clock based on a single particle,” says Holger Müller, a physicist at the University of California, Berkeley. “Its ticking rate is determined only by the particle’s mass.”

The idea for the clock stemmed from the quantum principle that particles also behave as waves, and vice versa. In particular, Müller and his colleagues wanted to determine how frequently the wave form of a single atom oscillates, a quantity that in quantum mechanics is inherently linked to the atom’s mass. Then the researchers could use those oscillations like swings of a pendulum to create a clock.

The snag in Müller’s plan was that it’s impossible to directly measure the oscillation frequency of waves of matter. The frequency of these waves is about 1025 hertz, 10 orders of magnitude higher than that of visible light waves. So Müller and his colleagues came up with an apparatus that creates two sets of waves — one based on a cesium atom at rest and another on the atom in motion. The researchers measured the frequency difference between the waves and then used that number, a manageable 100,000 hertz or so, to calculate the much larger oscillation frequency of cesium at rest.

With this approach, Müller was able to use the wave frequency of the cesium atom to create a clock that would gain or lose a second after eight years. That’s better than a wristwatch but about a hundred millionth as precise as today’s best atomic clocks, which count the frequency of light emissions from an atom as its electrons release small bursts of energy.

Physicists not involved with Müller’s research are impressed with his clever technique but are skeptical about its potential for precise timekeeping. “I think the paper is slightly oversold,” says Vladan Vuletić, a quantum physicist at MIT.

Other researchers have a more conceptual objection: Because there is nothing at this frequency actually oscillating within the atom, they say it is not a clock at all. “It may be a clock numerically, but it’s not a physical clock,” says Christian Bordé, a physicist at the Paris Observatory. Müller counters that the clock’s simplicity is its greatest trait: He is measuring an intrinsic quantum property of an atom, one that depends only on the atom’s mass.

In fact, this relationship between frequency and mass means Müller’s technique may prove most useful as a scale for measuring mass. Scientists define the kilogram, the base unit of mass, with a lump of metal stored in a French vault — a lump that is likely gaining heft from contamination (SN: 11/20/10, p. 12). The international General Conference on Weights and Measures, led by Bordé, wants to replace this artifact with a kilogram standard based on fundamental physical constants.

Müller says he can do just that by measuring the frequency of matter waves to accurately determine an atom’s mass. Once he finds the mass of one atom, he says, it is straightforward to relate it to the masses of other atoms. He will have a lot of convincing to do, but Müller plans to let the scientific process play out to test his ideas. “This is a concept that physicists never thought about,” he says. “This frequency wasn’t measurable until now.”

jeannemcright:

Anteater Skull by Jeanne McRight

bunsenb:

I am psyched on these illustrations by Nicholas Beales! Coming from a microbiology and immunology background, I absolutely approved!

Project Blood 48:14 by Nicholas Beales on Behance

These are awesome! I’d love these as posters, they look like strange little warriors each pertaining to their own clan. In the story where these come from and irl it’s pretty much like that, check it out at the link!

autistic-scientist:

There are thousands of receptor molecules on the surface of every cell in the body.  Each receptor is designed to seek out the complementary electron cloud from a receptor molecule.  When binding occurs, the stimulus is associated with the states of mind we could term “neuropeptides”.
It’s been agreed for quite some time that emotions are controlled within certain parts of the brain.  However, that’s an incomplete picture — because emotions are biochemical processes.  They are a function of these neuropeptides and the interactions between the various organs of the body.
Emotions occurs in the blood, the muscles, the tissues, and the bones — at the same time, and are then registered in the brain.  The limbic system transfers this information to the frontal cortex, where we then become conscious of the emotion.  It is only at this point that we begin to form ideas about what it is that we are feeling.  The experience itself occurs at a preconscious and physiological level, long before we become aware of what’s happening.The vehicle that the mind and body use to communicate with each other is the chemistry of emotion.  All emotion is instigated and stored at a cellular level.  The “mind” is not stored in the brain — but throughout the whole body. 
The body is the subconscious mind and the brain is the conscious mind.  Information is stored in the DNA and concentrated in neuropeptieds at certain nodal points, which some have termed, the “chakrahs”.

autistic-scientist:

There are thousands of receptor molecules on the surface of every cell in the body.  Each receptor is designed to seek out the complementary electron cloud from a receptor molecule.  When binding occurs, the stimulus is associated with the states of mind we could term “neuropeptides”.

It’s been agreed for quite some time that emotions are controlled within certain parts of the brain.  However, that’s an incomplete picture — because emotions are biochemical processes.  They are a function of these neuropeptides and the interactions between the various organs of the body.

Emotions occurs in the blood, the muscles, the tissues, and the bones — at the same time, and are then registered in the brain.  The limbic system transfers this information to the frontal cortex, where we then become conscious of the emotion.  It is only at this point that we begin to form ideas about what it is that we are feeling.  The experience itself occurs at a preconscious and physiological level, long before we become aware of what’s happening.

The vehicle that the mind and body use to communicate with each other is the chemistry of emotion.  All emotion is instigated and stored at a cellular level.  The “mind” is not stored in the brain — but throughout the whole body

The body is the subconscious mind and the brain is the conscious mind.  Information is stored in the DNA and concentrated in neuropeptieds at certain nodal points, which some have termed, the “chakrahs”.

(via autistic-scientist-deactivated2)

laboratoryequipment:

Oil and Water May Work Together After All

Water transforms into a previously unknown structure in between a liquid and a vapor when in contact with alcohol molecules containing long oily chains, according to Purdue Univ. researchers. However, around short oily chains, water is more ice-like.

Water plays a huge role in biological processes, from protein folding to membrane formation, and it could be that this transformation is useful in a way not yet understood, says Dor Ben-Amotz, the professor of chemistry who led the research. Ben-Amotz’s research team found that as they examined alcohols with increasingly long carbon chains, the transformation occurred at lower and lower temperatures.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/oil-and-water-may-work-together-after-all

cozydark:

Harnessing the Sun’s Energy by Funneling Photons |

The quest to harness a broader spectrum of sunlight’s energy to produce electricity has taken a radically new turn, with the proposal of a “solar energy funnel” that takes advantage of materials under elastic strain.

“We’re trying to use elastic strains to produce unprecedented properties,” says Ju Li, an MIT professor and corresponding author of a paper describing the new solar-funnel concept that was published this week in the journal Nature Photonics.

In this case, the “funnel” is a metaphor: Electrons and their counterparts, holes — which are split off from atoms by the energy of photons — are driven to the center of the structure by electronic forces, not by gravity as in a household funnel. And yet, as it happens, the material actually does assume the shape of a funnel: It is a stretched sheet of vanishingly thin material, poked down at its center by a microscopic needle that indents the surface and produces a curved, funnel-like shape. continue reading

biocanvas:

The epidermis of a mouse tail depicting the hair follicle bulge in red.

Image by Claire Cox and Michaela Frye, University of Cambridge.

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Devoted Deep Sea Squid Mama

Parental instincts aren’t exactly common place in the invertebrate world. Squid typically die after spawning, leaving orphaned squidlets to fend for themselves in the big bad ocean. But as in all of biology, there are exceptions.

Check out this incredible image of a mama squid tending to her (approx. 360) eggs — only the second species of brooding squid to be discovered, ever!

Man, the deep sea is cool. Cephalopods are also cool. 

This paper was just published. Imagine how many more cool squid are down there. 

sciencecenter:

Asbestopluma hypogeaa species of carnivorous sponge

A. hypogea is a glass sponge that lives in caves in Europe. It snares tiny crustaceans, like the one shown above, and consumes them through phagocytosis. While most sponges are filter feeders, sponges that live in nutrient-poor water resort to eating other creatures for sustenance. Indeed, scientists have just discovered a new species of carnivorous sponge, Chondrocladia lyra, that lives nearly two miles under the sea off the coast of California. Although the picture is lower quality than the above glass sponge, C. lyra still looks pretty wild:

Read more about the new sponge species here.

caattt:

Scanning electron micrograph of osteoporotic bone (via Wellcome Image of the Month: Osteoporosis « Wellcome Trust Blog)

theshinyboogie:

Birds, a Golden Nature Guide (1956)

brandx:

GIANT MARBLE HARVESTS ENERGY FROM SUN AND MOON

This sun-tracking, weatherproof sphere is so sensitive to light that it can even harvest moonlight and convert it into electricity.

Read more.

iheartchaos:

And apparently, sperm whales sleep vertically. Now you know.

…in 2008, a team of researchers off the coast of northern Chile happened upon a pod of vertically bobbing sperm whales that seemed completely oblivious to its presence. Not a single whale responded to the team’s boat until one of them was accidentally nudged, at which point it awoke and fled, along with the rest of the group. The team’s findings suggest that, unlike other cetaceans, sperm whales appear to enter short, but periodic, bouts of sleep throughout the day — an observation that Kaplan says could hint that sperm-whales are actually “the least sleep-dependent mammals known.”

Via