Science is the poetry of Nature.







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Posts tagged "cave"

nbcnightlynews:

National Corvette Museum brings in a drone to show the extensive damage caused after a sinkhole opens up and swallows 8 Corvettes

Video: National Corvette Museum

Just a friendly reminder that sinkholes can pop up just about anywhere! Though, this had a bit more of a chance happening seeing as the museum is so close to Mammoth Cave National Park.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Cave Frame

Stars trail around the north celestial pole (with Polaris or the North Star near the center) as photographed from inside Roodafshan cave in Alborz Mountains of Iran.

With a magnificent entrance hall of 168 m length, 94 m width and 40 m high it is the biggest known cave chamber in Iran. - Amir Abolfath

ikenbot:

Infinite Cave in Vietnam

The amazing photo featured above was taken in a huge cavern complex within the bowels of central Vietnam – in Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park. During the spring of 2009, a team of spelunkers began exploring a mountain river cave in Vietnam and discovered a passage carved by a subterranean river millions of years ago.

Like a castle on a knoll, a limestone formation shines beneath a skylight in Hang Son Doong Cave. A monsoon storm had just filled the pool in the foreground, signaling that exploring season was ending. Referred to as the “infinite cave” this underground labyrinth is more than 2.5 mi long (4.0 km).

Photographer: Carsten Peter/©National Geographic Magazine

Summary Author: Mark Jenkins/©National Geographic Magazine

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

jtotheizzoe:

Despite millions of years of isolation, cave bacteria resist modern antibiotics

Antibiotic resistance is not a new problem. Almroth Wright and Alexander Fleming predicted penicillin resistance almost as soon as it was discovered. But we like to think that the modern scourge of dangerously resistant bacteria is a problem of not enough drug options, and misuse of the ones we have.

Turns out that nature’s way ahead of us. A team exploring Carlsbad’s Lechuguilla Cave, a 122-mile expanse of acidic pools and metallic outcroppings, isolated 93 bacteria that had evolved in the cave over millions of years. These bacteria, a handful of what likely lives in the cave, have never met our antibiotic drugs.

Yet they turned out to be resistant to nearly all of them, and some in ways we’ve never seen before. Why?

Antibiotics like penicillin, or tetracycline, or even daptomycin (one of our toughest weapons) come from natural sources. They were used by microbes to kill each other long before we stole their chemicals for our own use. So it’s no surprise that millions of years of evolution has created pathways of resistance to these weapons.

Dig into soil, rock or other bacterial habitats, and you’ll be looking at a war that’s been waged for millions of years, with weapons we have yet to describe. And nature has built up defenses of equal strength.

From enzymes that eat plastic or chew up cellulose to make ethanol to pathways that digest even our toughest antibiotics, microbial biology is a vast ocean of exotic chemistry. It’s time for a change of attitude for fighting bugs. No matter how powerful the chemical we take from nature, chances are that she’s already figured out a way to kill it with fire. It’s time to assume that all antibiotics are already beaten, and use them accordingly.

Want some advice? Wash your hands. Soap still works, at least until we explore the next cave.

(via Not Exactly Rocket Science)

10 Most Incredible Cave Waterfalls On Earth
→ Pictured here: Ruby Falls, Tennessee, USA. Gaping Gill, UK. Waiahuakua Sea Cave, Hawaii, USA. Natural Bridge, Springbrook Park, Australia.

Epic Landscapes: Photos from the UK.

Six photos from the winners of the 2010 “Take A View” photography competition from walkmag.co.uk. Photos can be seen in full view here, which include:

  • Nicola Harkness: Waterfall of Smoo Burn, seen through the dim light of the second chamber of the cave – a combined sea and freshwater cave in the far north of Sutherland. (main [large] photo)
  • Dudley Williams: “Sand Patterns” – photograph of a freshwater run-off across a beach on the Isle of Eigg, Scotland, creating stunning patterns in the sand. The soft tones are provided by the late-winter dawn. (top left [small] photo)
  • Stephen Garnett: Image of Malham Moor in winter, North Yorkshire, England. (top middle [small] photo)
  • Slawek Staszczuk: View of the South Downs near Kingston, East Sussex, England. (top right [small] photo)
  • Antony Spencer’s Corfe Castle, Dorset, England. (bottom left photo)
  • Marcus McAdam: “Ice Steps”, taken at Sligachan on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. (bottom right photo)

10 Most Incredible Cave Waterfalls On Earth
→ Pictured here: Ruby Falls, Tennessee, USA. Gaping Gill, UK. Waiahuakua Sea Cave, Hawaii, USA. Natural Bridge, Springbrook Park, Australia.

geologise:

The book “Orda Cave Awareness Project” (by samebody)

It is dedicated to the biggest underwater gypsum cave in the world. It is located near Orda village (Perm region, Russia). The book contains articles by geologists, stories about animal life of the cave, interviews with pioneers, reviews by leading experts in cave diving. The book is illustrated with more than 100 unique underwater photos. Also the first published map of Orda cave with additions and clarifications. The work on the book took half a year, the team made more than 150 dives. All 5 kilometers of its underwater galleries were photographed. ordacave.ru.

geologise:

Echo Hall - Camps Gulf Cave (by _Tim Curtis_)

Camps Gulf Cave is located in Tennessee at the Fall Creek Falls State Park. There are a few others, like Rumbling Falls Cave, which is the second largest cave chamber in the United States. All caves are currently closed in order to save the bats that live there from WNS.

laboratoryequipment:

Cave Rocks Record Ancient WeatherDarrel Tremaine has been known to go to extremes for his research, such as crawling on his hands and knees through a dark, muddy limestone cave in Northwest Florida to learn more about the weather thousands of years ago. His goal? To compare ancient meteorological patterns with modern ones in the northern Gulf of Mexico region and ultimately inform policymakers on how to build a sustainable water supply. On a recent morning, the Florida State Univ. doctoral student in oceanography huddled with artisan Charlie Scott-Smith at Florida State’s Master Craftsman Studios. The two were making molds of stalagmites, the natural formations rising from the floor of limestone caves that are formed by the dripping of water containing calcium carbonate. Their counterparts, stalactites, hang from the ceilings of such caves.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Cave-Rocks-Record-Ancient-Weather-120911.aspx

laboratoryequipment:

Cave Rocks Record Ancient Weather

Darrel Tremaine has been known to go to extremes for his research, such as crawling on his hands and knees through a dark, muddy limestone cave in Northwest Florida to learn more about the weather thousands of years ago. His goal? To compare ancient meteorological patterns with modern ones in the northern Gulf of Mexico region and ultimately inform policymakers on how to build a sustainable water supply. On a recent morning, the Florida State Univ. doctoral student in oceanography huddled with artisan Charlie Scott-Smith at Florida State’s Master Craftsman Studios. The two were making molds of stalagmites, the natural formations rising from the floor of limestone caves that are formed by the dripping of water containing calcium carbonate. Their counterparts, stalactites, hang from the ceilings of such caves.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Cave-Rocks-Record-Ancient-Weather-120911.aspx

cwnl:

Infinite Cave in Vietnam

The amazing photo featured above was taken in a huge cavern complex within the bowels of central Vietnam – in Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park. During the spring of 2009, a team of spelunkers began exploring a mountain river cave in Vietnam and discovered a passage carved by a subterranean river millions of years ago.

Like a castle on a knoll, a limestone formation shines beneath a skylight in Hang Son Doong Cave. A monsoon storm had just filled the pool in the foreground, signaling that exploring season was ending. Referred to as the “infinite cave” this underground labyrinth is more than 2.5 mi long (4.0 km).

Photographer: Carsten Peter/©National Geographic Magazine

Summary Author: Mark Jenkins/©National Geographic Magazine

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

geologise:

Cave Of The Crystals | Naica, Chihuahua, Mexico

I remember when this was first discovered, and how blown away I was when photos were released of this magnificent wonder. There’s a documentary out there called, “Naica: Beyond The Crystal Cave” and another that hits on other sister caves as well, “Into The Lost Crystal Caves”. Definitely interesting if you want to watch them go through the cave to get samples and explore. A dangerous but extremely satisfying task! Here’s a bit of information on the Crystal Caves in Naica, Mexico.

  • It contains some of the largest (in size, mass, length, etc) natural crystals ever found on Earth. A Gypsum beam was found to be 11 metres (36 feet) in length, 4 metres (13 feet) in width, and weigh around 55 tons.
  • It is found in a horseshoe-shaped cavity of limestone rock, which used to be full of mineral-rich hot water, but has since been kept drained.
  • The cave is extremely hot with air temperatures reaching up to 58 °C (136 °F) with 90 to 99 percent humidity.
  • The cave was filled with mineral-rich hot water (a constant 50 °C+) for around 500,000 years, which let these crystals form under the right conditions.

I’ve added a few links that take you to more photos and articles as well (along with its sister caves).

Crystal Cave - Svínafellsjökull in Skaftafell, Iceland (orvaratli)

The centuries old ice coming down the slopes of Öræfajökull via Svínafellsjökull glacier has had almost all of the air pressed out of the ice. Once air has been pressed out the ice turns into this magically blue crystal like ice. The outer surface of this ice (the surface of the glacier) gets bombarded by weather, sun-rays, dust and other things and it transforms the crystal blue ice white. Hidden under the white surface is the blue ice.

This blue ice can be seen however under certain circumstances. It can be seen in winter after long periods of rain when the surface layer of the glacier has been washed away. It can be seen in ice-caves like this one (unsafe in summer) and on floating icebergs that have recently rolled over.

This ice cave is on the edge of the glacier where it enters into a lagoon. It is only possible to access it when the lagoon is frozen. Ice caves are in general unstable things and can collapse at any time. They are however much more stable in winter when the cold temperatures harden the ice. Even so we could hear constant cracking sounds inside the cave. It was not because it was going to collapse but because the cave was moving along with the glacier itself. Each time the glacier moved a millimeter loud sounds could be heard.